Content tagged with "fall wildflower"

Cardinal Flower

Photo of cardinal flower plants in flower
Lobelia cardinalis
If you're looking for a splash of bright red for a wet place in your yard, this long-blooming Missouri native wildflower might be the plant you're looking for. The rest of us enjoy cardinal flower along streams and rivers, in bottomland forests, in ditches by roads, and in other wet places. More

Cardinal Flower

Photo of cardinal flower plants in flower
A Missouri native with exceptional landscaping potential, cardinal flower has been named a Plant of Merit for St. Louis and other regional gardeners. The red flowers of this species are attractive to hummingbirds, which are probably the major pollinators. Butterflies visit the flowers, too. More

Cardinal Flower

Photo of cardinal flower plants in flower
Cardinal flower, a type of lobelia, grows in wet places: along rivers and streams, in openings of bottomland forests, ditches, sloughs, swamps, and lakes. It’s also found in cultivation, where it prefers rich, humusy, medium to wet soils and partial shade. More

Carolina False Dandelion

Photo of Carolina false dandelion flowerhead.
Pyrrhopappus carolinianus
One of several native plants called dandelions, Carolina false dandelion is an annual with sulphur yellow flowers and puffy seedheads. More

Carolina False Dandelion (Basal Leaves)

Photo of Carolina false dandelion basal leaves.
The basal leaves of Carolina false dandelion are either entire or pinnatifid (like dandelion leaves), and they often have disappeared by flowering time. More

Carolina False Dandelion (Flowerhead)

Photo of Carolina false dandelion flowerhead.
The flowerheads of Carolina false dandelion are usually solitary, terminal, like those of dandelion but bright sulphur yellow. The inner florets appear dark-flecked from brownish fused anther bases, which surround the style and stigma. It blooms May–October. More

Chicory (Blue Sailors)

Photo of a chicory plant.
In summer and fall, the pretty blue flowers of chicory decorate roadsides and other disturbed areas. This weedy member of the aster family was introduced from Europe long ago. Its roots have been used as a coffee substitute. More

Chicory (Blue Sailors)

Photo of a chicory plant.
Cichorium intybus
In summer and fall, the pretty blue flowers of chicory decorate roadsides and other disturbed areas. This weedy member of the aster family was introduced from Europe long ago. Its roots have been used as a coffee substitute. More

Chicory (Blue Sailors) (Flowerhead)

Photo of a chicory flower head and buds, grasped in a hand.
The flowerheads of chicory emerge all along the stems with light blue or white (occasionally pink), strap-shaped ray florets that are toothed at end. It blooms May-October. More

Chicory (Blue Sailors) (Leaves)

Photo of a chicory leaf with a hand for scale.
The basal leaves of chicory resemble those of dandelion, with a prominent center vein, triangular lobes, and deep, rounded sinuses. The leaves become much smaller above the base. More