Content tagged with "fall wildflower"

Bull Thistle

Photo of bull thistle, a spiny thistle with a pink flowerhead
Bull thistle is a weedy introduction from Europe, found statewide. To tell it from our other thistles, note its stems with spiny-margined wings, and its leaves with the upper surface strongly roughened with stiff, spiny bristles. More

Bull Thistle

Photo of a bull thistle flowerhead.
Cirsium vulgare
Bull thistle is a weedy introduction from Europe, found statewide. To tell it from our other thistles, note its stems with spiny-margined wings, and its leaves with the upper surface strongly roughened with stiff, spiny bristles. More

Bull Thistle (Flowerhead)

Photo of a bull thistle flowerhead.
The flowerheads of bull thistle are reddish purple to purple, with a prominent involucre (the flowerhead base, covered by leaflike bracts), which is covered with a fine, cobweb-like silk. Spiny bracts grow right up to the flowerheads. More

Bull Thistle (Stem)

Photo of bull thistle showing stems with spiny wings.
Bull thistle has stems with spiny-margined wings. This trait, combined with the pink flowerheads, is a quick way to identify this common, weedy species. More

Butterfly Pea

Photo of butterfly pea plant with flowers
Butterfly pea is a low, shrubby, or twining perennial in the pea family, with showy, butterfly-like flowers. The leaves are compound with three leaflets. This species grows in the southern parts of Missouri, in acid soils. More

Butterfly Pea

Photo of butterfly pea plant with flowers
Clitoria mariana
Butterfly pea is a low, shrubby, or twining perennial in the pea family, with showy, butterfly-like flowers. The leaves are compound with three leaflets. This species grows in the southern parts of Missouri, in acid soils. More

Butterfly Weed

Photo of butterfly weed plant with flowers
Asclepias tuberosa
This bright orange milkweed is a favorite nectar plant for butterflies, and the leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of monarch butterflies. One of our showiest native wildflowers, butterfly weed is also a favorite of gardeners. More

Butterfly Weed

Photo of butterfly weed plant on a prairie
Butterfly weed, striking for its pure orange color, occurs in upland fields, prairies, glades, roadsides, wasteland, dry and rocky woods, and edges of woods, often on disturbed soil. It is also a favorite native plant for gardening. More

Butterfly Weed

Photo of butterfly weed plant with flowers
In case the name doesn’t make it clear, this milkweed is a favorite nectar plant for butterflies, and the leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of monarch butterflies. One of our showiest native wildflowers, butterfly weed is also a favorite of gardeners. More

Butterfly Weed (Flowers)

Photo of butterfly weed flowers
The flowers of butterfly weed are massively displayed in terminal umbels (umbrella-like clusters with stalks all arising from the tip of the stem). They can be many shades of orange to brick-red, and occasionally yellow. A close look at the individual flowers shows they have the same unique structure as other milkweeds. More