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Content tagged with "fall wildflower"

Photo of autumn sneezeweed flowerheads, closeup.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Autumn sneezeweed is a late-blooming perennial with conspicuously winged stems. The flowerheads have yellow, rounded disks. The ray flowers are fan-shaped, yellow, and notched.

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Photo of many autumn sneezeweed plants blooming in a grassy field.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Autumn sneezeweed grows in moist areas in meadows, prairies, ditches, and along streams. Like other sneezeweeds, it contains toxic, bitter substances, and grazing animals, including cattle, avoid eating it.

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Photo of autumn sneezeweed flowerheads, side view, with blue background.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Sneezeweeds were used historically by Native Americans and pioneers as snuff. Inhaling the dried, powdered disk florets caused violent, prolonged sneezing, and people did this as a way of alleviating colds, stuffy noses, headache, and other maladies.

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Photo of autumn sneezeweed flowerheads, closeup.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Helenium autumnale
Autumn sneezeweed is a late-blooming perennial with conspicuously winged stems. The flowerheads have yellow, domed disks. The ray flowers are fan-shaped, yellow, and notched.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed plant showing basal leaves, stalk, and flowers.

Beaked Hawkweed

Beaked hawkweed is a very hairy, usually single-stemmed perennial herb. The flowerheads appear in open clusters and are borne at the tips of the stems. The basal leaves are broadly obovate, very hairy, and rough, ranging in length to 8 inches. The stem leaves are smaller, becoming sessile, and also very hairy.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed flowers.

Beaked Hawkweed

Hieracium gronovii
A native wildflower of forests, blufftops, glades, pastures, and roadsides, beaked hawkweed looks something like a hairy, yellow-flowering chicory. It is found mostly south of the Missouri River.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed flowers.

Beaked Hawkweed (Flowers)

A native wildflower of forests, blufftops, glades, pastures, and roadsides, beaked hawkweed looks something like a hairy, yellow-flowering chicory. It is found mostly south of the Missouri River.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed spent flowers and seed heads.

Beaked Hawkweed (Seed Heads)

Beaked hawkweed is a native wildflower found mostly south of the Missouri River, in rocky, dry, open woods, fields, and ravines.

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Photo of beefsteak plant showing upper leaves and flower cluster

Beefsteak Plant

Introduced from Asia as an ornamental, beefsteak plant is common in moist or dry wooded bottomlands, open valley pastures, and along trails, railroads, and roadsides. It is edible, and red forms of it are often grown in herb gardens.

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Photo of beefsteak plant showing upper leaves and flower cluster

Beefsteak Plant (Wild Basil; Rattlesnake Weed; Shiso)

Perilla frutescens
Introduced as an ornamental, this native of Asia is common in moist or dry wooded bottomlands, open valley pastures, and along trails, railroads, and roadsides. Beefsteak plant is edible, and red forms of it are often grown in herb gardens.

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