Content tagged with "edible"

Common Blackberry

Image of a blackberry flower
Rubus allegheniensis
“Please don’t throw me into the briar patch!” The real truth about blackberry bushes is that the prickles are worth braving—whether you’re a rabbit seeking shelter or a berry-picker hunting the delicious fruits. More

Dewberry

Photo of dewberry flowers
Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries! More

Dewberry

Photo of dewberry flowers
Rubus flagellaris
Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries! More

Hackberry

Image of a hackberry leaf
Celtis occidentalis
Although it's named for its sweet, purple (edible) fruits, most people learn to identify hackberry because of its interesting bark, which develops numerous corky, wartlike projections that sometimes join to form ridges. More

Johnny-Jump-Up (Field Pansy)

Image of Johnny-jump-up.
Viola bicolor
It's not our largest violet, but it's one of the most common. The coloration of these delicate-looking flowers often looks faded. Look for it in fields, meadows, glades, rights-of-way, disturbed sites and possibly your front lawn. More

Pawpaw

Image of a pawpaw tree
Asimina triloba
“Way down yonder in the pawpaw patch” is an old song you might be familiar with—but today, surprisingly few Missourians know a pawpaw tree when they see one. This is a good tree to know, especially when the large, sweet fruit are ripening! More

Pecan

pecan tree
Carya illinoinensis
One of Missouri’s favorite nut trees is the pecan, which is a type of hickory—and hickories are in the walnut family! Originally pecan had a fairly limited, southern distribution, but today it is found in and out of cultivation nearly statewide, owing to the popularity of the nuts. More

Persimmon

persimmon
Diosypros virginiana
This medium-sized tree with the “alligator” bark is best known in the fall, when its orange, plumlike fruits come on. Be careful, however, to make sure a persimmon is ripe before you pop it into your mouth, or you could have a puckery surprise! More

Prairie Crab Apple

Malus ioensis
An attractive, small, ornamental tree with low, crooked branches and attractive spring flowers. Its hard, bitter fruits can be used in making tasty jellies, cider and vinegar. More

Slender Mountain Mint

Photo of slender mountain mint flowers
Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
Slender mountain mint has smooth, square stems, opposite, narrow leaves, and dense heads of 2-lipped white (or lavender) flowers. Aromatic and minty, it can be grown at home in the herb garden, and its leaves used for seasoning food. More