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Content tagged with "duck"

2008 Missouri Waterfowl-Hunting Forecast

It looks like the dramatic flooding this past year will impact Missouri waterfowl hunting opportunities in a variety of ways.

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A hunter accepts a duck from a retriever.

2014-15 Waterfowl Seasons Set

Missouri hunters will enjoy another liberal waterfowl hunting season, thanks to record-high duck populations.

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A Working Plan for Waterfowl

This content is archived
It's no accident duck populations are soaring.

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Photo of an American coot.

American Coot

The American coot is a black or dark gray ducklike member of the rail family. Adults have a black head and neck and a pointed, ivory-white bill with a black ring near the end.

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Photo of an American coot floating ducklike in water.

American Coot

Although it floats like a duck, the American coot is actually in the rail family. Note its short tail and wings and the pointed white bill.

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Photo of an American coot walking on ice, with lobed toes visible.

American Coot

The American coot has a chickenlike walk. Note that the toes are not webbed like a duck's but instead have distinctly scalloped lobes.

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Photo of an American coot.

American Coot

Fulica americana
Although it floats like a duck, the American coot is actually in the rail family. Note its short tail and wings, pointed white bill, chickenlike walk, and toes with scalloped lobes.

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Photo of American coot nest, eggs, and young.

American Coot Nest, Eggs, and Young

An American coot clutch usually contains 8-12 eggs, which are incubated for 23-25 days. The young are covered with down and are able to leave the nest within hours of hatching.

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Photo of an American coot nestling.

American Coot Nestling

Nestling American coots, upon hatching, have blackish down feathers above and orange hairlike feathers around the neck. The head is bald on top, and the bill is bright red.

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Photo of an American coot on its nest.

American Coot on Nest

American coots weave vegetation into shallow nests that float on water, attached to upright plant stalks.

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