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Content tagged with "cricket"

Image of camel cricket (cave cricket).

Camel Crickets (Cave Crickets)

Numerous species.
Humps aren’t just for camels, they’re for crickets, too! These odd-looking insects are commonly found in caves, basements, cellars and similar places.

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Eine Kleine Nacht Musik

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Crickets and katydids create "a little night music" of their own.

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Photo of an adult female field cricket

Female Field Cricket

Field crickets in the genus Gryllus are usually shiny black, and the different species are often best separated by singing pattern. This is a female G. pennsylvanicus (one of the more common species). You can tell she's a female from the needlelike (but harmless) ovipositor extending outward from the abdomen, which is used for laying eggs in the soil.

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Photo of an adult female house cricket walking on bark

Female House Cricket

The house cricket, Acheta domesticus, is light brown or tannish overall; the tan head has three dark crossbands. This is a female cricket: You can tell because she has a needlelike ovipositor at the tip of her abdomen. It's harmless to people. She uses it only to deposit her eggs into the soil.

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Photo of a female house cricket, side view

Female House Cricket

House crickets and field crickets share in common large heads, hind legs adapted for jumping, and stout, unmovable spines on the hind legs. They are common in many habitats, especially grassy areas such as lawns, fields, pastures, prairies, roadsides, but also in woods. They sometimes enter houses and other buildings. They are nocturnal; the sound of their chirping signifies “nighttime” to us.

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image of Field Cricket among moss and gravel

Field Cricket

Field crickets in the genus Gryllus are usually shiny black, and the different species are often best separated by singing pattern.

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Photo of an adult female field cricket

Field Crickets (House Crickets)

Gryllus spp., Acheta domesticus, and relatives
The familiar black or brown field crickets are celebrated singers. There are several species in Missouri.

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Photo of a male house cricket on sliced raw carrot

Male House Cricket

House crickets are probably native to Eurasia but are found nearly worldwide, having traveled the globe with people. They are commonly sold for fish bait and as a live pet food. They eat a wide variety of foods and can be kept as pets.

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Photo of male house cricket chirping by rubbing wings together

Male House Cricket Chirping

Male crickets chirp by rubbing rough portions of their wings together; by raising the wings at an angle, they form a resonating chamber sort of like a violin body. The calls attract females and also warn off rival males.

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