Content tagged with "crab spider"

Foliage Flower Spiders

Mecaphesa spp. and Misumessus spp.
The more obvious differences between this group of crab spiders and other flower crab spiders is that these generally are smaller, and their carapaces, abdomens and legs are spiny. More

Ridge-Faced Flower Spider

Photo of ridge-faced flower crab spider on daisy-family flower
The ridge-faced flower spider is a small, whitish or yellowish crab spider commonly found in flower heads. Often its carapace is marked with a brownish-yellow V, converging toward the carapace and made up of various spots or stripes. More

Ridge-Faced Flower Spider

Photo of ridge-faced flower crab spider on daisy-family flower
Misumenoides formosipes
This small, whitish-yellow or yellowish-brown crab spider is commonly found in flower heads. Often its carapace is slightly greenish, with a broad whitish-yellow midband bordered by darker, thinner sides of yellowish-brown. More

Ridge-Faced Flower Spider Waiting For Prey

Photo of a ridge-faced flower crab spider in center of flower
Like other crab spiders, ridge-faced flower spiders don't build webs to net their prey; instead, they wait quietly on flowers and ambush insects as they come for nectar and pollen. More

Smooth Flower Crab Spider

Photo of a smooth flower crab spider, yellow individual, on ox-eye daisy flower
Misumena vatia
Smooth flower crab spiders are often confused with other crab spiders. Like chameleons, they have some capacity to change color from white to yellow, depending upon the blossoms they are inhabiting. The female often has an orange or reddish stripe running along each side of the abdomen, extending from the front to about halfway down the side. More

Smooth Flower Crab Spider On Aster Flower

Photo of a smooth flower crab spider, whitish individual, on native aster flower
The female has a white or yellow carapace, darkening somewhat toward the edges, without spines. The eye region can be marked red, as the yellow-white abdomen often is, with two separate stripes extending midway around the perimeter of the abdomen. More

Smooth Flower Crab Spider On Ox-Eye Daisy

Photo of a smooth flower crab spider, yellow individual, on ox-eye daisy flower
Smooth flower crab spiders have some capacity to change color from white to yellow, depending upon the blossoms they are inhabiting. They don't use webs to capture their prey; instead, they hide in flowers and wait for insects to fly or crawl to them. Crab spiders often look like part of the flowers they inhabit. More

Xysticus Crab Spider

photo of a Xysticus crab spider, yellow individual
Crab spiders capture prey by sitting quietly and waiting for an insect or other spider to pass by. Then, they simply grab and bite it. Moths and butterflies make up the bulk of their prey. More

Xysticus Crab Spider (Tan Individual)

Photo of a Xysticus crab spider, tan individual
Generally larger than flower crab spiders, Xysticus crab spiders are usually dull gray and brown and have brown, rusty, tan, white or yellow markings, and they often have a midstripe on top of the carapace (head). The first pair of legs are large and powerful, as in flower crab spiders, and are covered with many tiny spines. More

Xysticus Crab Spiders

Photo of a Xysticus crab spider, tan individual
Xysticus spp.
There are several species of crab spiders in the genus Xysticus in Missouri. Generally larger than flower crab spiders, they are usually dull gray and brown and have brown, white or yellow markings, especially on the abdomen. They tend to live under bark or on the ground in leaf litter. More