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Content tagged with "conifer"

austrian pine

Austrian Pine

Pinus nigra
Primarily a landscaping tree, Austrian pine sometimes reproduces here on its own, and for this reason it's officially included in the flora of our state. Usually, you find it in urban and suburban ornamental plantings or, if you're out hiking, persisting at old home sites.

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Illustration of bald cypress leaves and cones.

Bald Cypress

Bald cypress, Taxodium distichum.

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Illustration of bald cypress leaves and cones.

Bald Cypress

Taxodium distichum
Bald cypress is an “evergreen” tree that is not evergreen! Like the leaves of hardwoods, its needles turn yellow in the fall and are shed. A tree associated with dark, mysterious swamps, its impressive form now graces many public landscapes.

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Canadian Hemlock

Tsuga canadensis
Also called eastern hemlock, this tree is encountered only in landscaping in our state. But based on one instance in Oregon County, we know it can reproduce and spread here on its own. So if you find it on a hike, it was almost certainly planted there at some point. Look around for a cistern, old home foundation and other persisting garden plants nearby.

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eastern white pine

Eastern White Pine

Pinus strobus
It is unlikely you will find an eastern white pine on a hike, unless you come across an old homesite where somebody planted it, or the trees that were its parents. A native to much of eastern North America, it has been widely introduced in Missouri and sometimes reproduces on its own.

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photo of Houf Pine Forest

Houf Pine Forest

Shortleaf pine forest.

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Download and review the factors that affected Missouri’s trees and forests in 2012, including invasive forest pests, other insects, diseases and weather.

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Pining for The Dwindling Shortleaf

This content is archived
Missouri's only native pine played a major role in the history of our state.

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scotch pine

Scotch Pine (Scots Pine)

Pinus sylvestris
This nonnative pine is one of America's favorite Christmas trees; it has also been popular for screening and as a landscaping ornamental. Unfortunately, it is very susceptible to the pine wilt nematode, a roundworm that kills the trees it infects usually within months.

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