Content tagged with "coneflower"

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A pale purple coneflower rises out of the remnants of a glade at Little Lost Creek Conservation Area as a Conservation Department forester cuts a cedar tree in the background. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of several black-eyed Susan flowers.
Its profusion of cheery, bright yellow flowers make black-eyed Susan one of our most beloved wildflowers. It is one of nine species of Rudbeckia recorded in Missouri, and it is the most familiar. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of black-eyed Susan plants blooming along the edge of a field.
Black-eyed Susan commonly grows in pastures, old fields, railroads, roadsides, and open, disturbed areas. This is the most abundant rudbeckia in Missouri and the one that prospers best in disturbed habitats. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of black-eyed Susan flowerhead with a beetle on it.
In the 1970s, researchers explored the different patterns of reflected ultraviolet light in the corollas of this and other rudbeckias. Although UV light is invisible to humans, bees and some other insects can see it, and the special patterns in the flowers serve especially to attract them. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of black-eyed Susan flowerhead.
Black-eyed Susan flowerheads are solitary or in loose, open clusters, terminal on the stalk, and grow to 4 inches across. The 8–21 ray flowers are rich yellow or orangish and slender. The central disk is deep brown to purple-brown and hemispherical, becoming egg-shaped with maturity. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of several black-eyed Susan flowers.
Rudbeckia hirta
Black-eyed Susan is a tremendously popular native wildflower for gardening. It’s also commonly planted along roadways, so when it’s blooming, May through October, you’re sure to see it somewhere. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of black-eyed Susan flowerhead.
Black-eyed Susan is popular as a native garden ornamental and is often sold as a cut flower. Historically, Native Americans used this and other Rudbeckia species medicinally. More

Black-Eyed Susan

Photo of black-eyed Susan flowerheads.
Black-eyed Susan is a tremendously popular native wildflower for gardening. It’s also commonly planted along roadways, so when it’s blooming, May through October, you’re sure to see it somewhere. More

Brown-Eyed Susan

Photo of bushy clump of brown-eyed Susan plants.
Brown-eyed Susan is a bushy perennial with much-branching stems. It blooms June–November. More

Brown-Eyed Susan

Photo of bushy clump of brown-eyed Susan plants.
Rudbeckia triloba
Brown-eyed Susan is a bushy perennial with much-branching stems and plenty of flowerheads. Compared to Missouri’s other Rudbeckia species, its flowerheads are the smallest, growing to only about one inch across. More