Search

Content tagged with "cat"

Photo of bobcat

Bobcat

Lynx rufus
This short-tailed wild cat has a distinctive streaked and spotted pattern, a wide face and pointy ears often with black tufts.

Read more

Cats on the Prowl

This content is archived
America's most popular pet is chewing into our wild bird population.

Read more

Image of a mountain lion

Mountain Lion

Puma concolor
Mountain lions hadn't been seen in Missouri since 1927 — but in 1994, conclusive physical evidence proved they are reappearing in our state. These animals probably are individuals dispersing from other states, and no breeding population seems to have been reestablished.

Read more

Photo of a dead mountain lion lying on the tailgate of a pickup truck.

Mountain Lion Hit by Car

This mountain lion was struck by a car on May 12, 2015, in Laclede County, on I-44 near the Gasconade River. Because of its severe injuries, it had to be euthanized. It was an adult male. As they disperse to find their own territories, young males often wander hundreds of miles. The ones that have shown up in Missouri have come from states to our west. Because biologists have not discovered proof of a breeding population in our state, the species is still considered extirpated here and indiscriminate killing is illegal. Any that are killed must be reported to the Conservation Department within 24 hours.

Read more

Photo of a mountain lion’s forepaw with a human hand next to it for scale.

Mountain Lion Paw

Mountain lion paws are much larger than those of any other felines in our state. The tracks they leave are 3 inches long (bobcats’ are 2 inches long). Note the three lobes at the base of the heel pad (dogs and coyotes have only a single indent at the bottom of their pads), and the teardrop-shaped (not oval) toe pads.

Read more

Photo of a dead mountain lion’s forepaw held up by a person’s hand, with thumb c

Mountain Lion Paw

Mountain lion paws are similar to those of other cats in that the claws are retractable and are only extended when they are climbing or trying to grip something. For this reason, as they leave tracks, the claws usually don’t leave marks. The tracks of dogs, coyotes, and other canids usually show small holes where the claws touched the substrate.

Read more

News and Almanac

This content is archived
"News and Almanac" for the March 2007 Missouri Conservationist.

Read more