Search

Content tagged with "bedstraw"

Photo of cleavers flower cluster with developing fruits

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Galium aparine
The tiny white flowers of this native plant are not very memorable, but the curious, sticky-feeling whorls of narrow leaves and lightweight, 4-sided stems make cleavers unique. And then there’s the tiny, round, “Velcro” covered balls of the seeds, which “stick tight” to your socks!

Read more

Photo of cleavers plants showing stalks with flower clusters

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers is called “bedstraw” because early settlers used the dried, lightweight, pleasantly aromatic “straw” to fill bedding. When dried and roasted, the fruits have been used as a coffee substitute; it is said to be one of the better-tasting coffee substitutes from North America.

Read more

Photo of cleavers, several plants in a colony

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers is a spreading, sprawling annual plant with 4-sided stems that are rarely upright. It occurs in moist or rich woods and thickets, wooded valleys, waste places, roadsides, and gardens—almost any shaded area.

Read more

Photo of cleavers plants showing stalks with flower clusters

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers has narrow leaves that are in whorls of 6 to 8. They feel sticky due to small, coarse, recurving hairs. The stems are lightweight and 4-sided.

Read more

Photo of cleavers flower cluster with developing fruits

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers has tiny, white, 4-petaled flowers that arise on stems from the leaf axils. The fruits are the tiny, round, “Velcro” covered balls that “stick tight” to your socks.

Read more