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Content tagged with "bald eagle"

American Bald Eagle perched near Mill Creek at Peck Ranch Conservation Area

American Bald Eagle perched near Mill Creek at Peck Ranch Conservation Area

American Bald Eagle perched near Mill Creek at Peck Ranch Conservation Area

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Photo of bald eagle soaring

Bald Eagle

Haliaeetus leucocephalus
A U.S. national symbol, the mature bald eagle is unmistakable with its dark brown body, yellow bill, and white head and tail. It soars with wings held flat and can have a 7-foot wingspan.

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Photo of immature bald eagle perched on a branch

Bald Eagle (Immature)

Young bald eagles are nomadic during their first four years of life. They explore over hundreds of miles, dispersing, seeking territories of their own. They acquire adult plumage at about age 5. Bald eagles can live for more than 30 years.

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Photo of bald eagle flapping over water

Bald Eagle Flapping

The bald eagle’s return to the Lower 48 is a conservation success story. From a low in the 1950s of about 3,000 nesting pairs, there are now about 10,000 pairs of bald eagles nesting in the Lower 48. That’s about half as many that nested here historically.

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Photo of two juvenile bald eagles in nest

Bald Eagle Nest

A bald eagle nest is large and can be 13 feet deep and 8 feet across. A pair produces 1–3 eggs annually, but rarely do all three chicks reach maturity.

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Photo of bald eagle perched on a branch

Bald Eagle Perched

A mature bald eagle is unmistakable with its dark brown body, yellow bill, and white head and tail. It soars with wings held flat and can have a 7-foot wingspan.

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Photo of bald eagle skimming over water, feet stretched

Bald Eagle Skimming Over Water

Bald eagles are usually observed near lakes, rivers, and marshes as they forage for fish or carrion.

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Photo of bald eagle soaring

Bald Eagle Soaring

In flight, mature bald eagles are relatively easy to identify. They have a dark brown body with white head and tail. In Missouri, they are observed near lakes, rivers, and marshes, particularly in winter.

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