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Content tagged with "aster"

Manage your Missouri property to help this endangered plant.

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Photo of two golden aster flowerheads plus a few leaves.

Golden Aster (Camphorweed; Hairy Golden Aster)

Golden aster can cover entire valleys with its bright yellow flowers. It blooms June through October and is scattered mostly south of the Missouri River.

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Photo of two golden aster flowerheads plus a few leaves.

Golden Aster (Camphorweed; Hairy Golden Aster)

Heterotheca camporum (syn. Chrysopsis villosa var. camporum)
Golden aster can cover entire valleys with its bright yellow flowers. It blooms June through October and is scattered mostly south of the Missouri River.

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Photo of New England aster plants with flowers

New England Aster

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (formerly Aster novae-angliae)
One of our showiest native fall-blooming wildflowers, New England aster contributes to Missouri's colorful autumn landscape. The petallike ray florets of wild plants range from reddish purple to purple.

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Photo of New England aster plants with flowers

New England Aster

One of our showiest native fall-blooming wildflowers, New England aster contributes to Missouri's colorful autumn landscape. The petallike ray florets of wild plants range from reddish purple to purple.

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Photo of oblong-leaved aster showing masses of purple flowerheads

Oblong-Leaved Aster (Aromatic Aster)

Symphyotrichum oblongifolium (formerly Aster oblongifolius)
This well-named native aster is notable for the fragrance of its foliage and its crowded, stalkless, clasping, hairy, narrow (oblong) leaves. Like most of our other native asters, oblong-leaved aster blooms in late summer and fall.

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Photo of oblong-leaved aster showing masses of purple flowerheads

Oblong-Leaved Aster (Aromatic Aster)

This well-named native aster is notable for the fragrance of its foliage and its crowded, stalkless, clasping, hairy, narrow (oblong) leaves. Like most of our other native asters, oblong-leaved aster blooms in late summer and fall.

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Philadelphia Fleabane

Erigeron philadelphicus
The antique belief that this plant might repel fleas gives the fleabanes their name. There are more than 170 fleabanes in the genus Erigeron in North America. This one is scattered to common nearly throughout Missouri. Native Americans used this species medicinally for a variety of ailments.

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Photo of white heath aster flowers

White Heath Aster

Symphyotrichum pilosum (formerly Aster pilosus)
Of the many native asters in Missouri, white heath aster is one of the most widespread and weediest. It is found in uplands, bottomlands, and nearly all habitats in between. It has a shrubby, wide-branching habit, and the stem leaves are thin and needlelike.

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