Content tagged with "assassin bug"

Assassin Bug

image of Assassin Bug crawling on a leaf
Although many species of assassin bugs are black or brown, some are more brightly colored. They have an elongated head bearing a single, clawlike tube used for piercing and injecting venom into their prey. More

Assassin Bugs

image of Assassin Bug crawling on a leaf
Nearly 200 species in North America north of Mexico
Assassin bugs are usually black or brown, with an elongated head bearing a single, clawlike tube used for piercing and injecting venom into their prey. They are common in Missouri. More

Wheel Bug

image of a Wheel Bug, Side View
Arilus cristatus
This large gray or brown insect carries something interesting on its back: Is it a cog, or a wheel, or a circular saw blade? It’s unmistakable! More

Wheel Bug Adult

image of a Wheel Bug, Side View
Adult wheel bugs are easily identified by the coglike “wheel” on the back. Note the narrow head bearing a single, clawlike tube used for piercing and injecting venom into their prey. Handling this and other assassin bugs is not recommended, as they can inflict a painful bite. More

Wheel Bug Eating Asian Lady Beetle

image of a Wheel Bug Eating Asian Lady Beetle
Much like a single-fanged spider, a wheel bug bites its prey, delivering a subduing venom that causes the prey insect’s tissues to liquify. The “meat” of the insect can then be sucked up through the wheel bug’s strawlike beak. More

Wheel Bug Egg Cluster

Photo of a cluster of wheel bug eggs
Wheel bugs have only one brood per year. Adults mate in autumn, and the females lay six-sided clusters of cylindrical brown eggs on solid objects such as trees and the sides of buildings. Hatchlings emerge in spring and grow slowly, taking months to mature. More

Wheel Bug Nymph

image of an immature wheel bug
The immature nymphs of wheel bugs are reddish with black legs. They can look rather spiderlike or antlike. They grow slowly and devour many insects as the season progresses. Note the jointed antennae. More