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Content tagged with "arachnid"

Photo of a triangulate orb weaver

Triangulate Orb Weaver

Verrucosa arenata
In late summer and fall, woodland hikers can count on walking into the triangulate orb weaver's web. These webs are delicate circles that help the spider snare tiny flying insects.

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Image of a triangulate orb weaver

Triangulate Orb Weaver

This orb-weaving spider usually rests centered in its web head-up instead of head-down. Here, it is shown sideways.

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Photo of a triangulate orb weaver

Triangulate Orb Weaver

The triangulate is Missouri's only orb weaver that rests centered in its web head-up instead of head-down. A triangle of color on the abdomen resembles a white, pink, or yellow flattened drop of shiny glue pointing away from the spider's head.

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Up, Up and Away

This content is archived
Spiders soar with the wind to spread their range.

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white backed garden spider

White-Backed Garden Spider

Argiope trifasciata
The white-backed garden spider is slightly smaller than the black-and-yellow garden spider and has a pointier hind end. The abdomen is patterned with many thin silver and yellow transverse lines and thicker black, spotty lines.

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image of a bold jumping spider

White-Spotted Jumping Spider (Bold Jumping Spider)

To identify this jumping spider, note the fuzzy, usually black body with white, orange or reddish spots on the abdomen.

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image of a bold jumping spider

White-Spotted Jumping Spider (Bold Jumping Spider)

Phidippus audax
The white-spotted jumping spider, like most other jumping spiders, is fuzzy, makes jerky movements, jumps surprisingly long distances, and doesn't build webs. This species usually has a black body with white, orange, or reddish spots on the abdomen.

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Image of a wolf spider

Wolf Spider

Image of a wolf spider.

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Image of a wolf spider

Wolf Spider

Image of a wolf spider.

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Photo of wolf spider with young

Wolf Spider With Young

Female wolf spiders have strong maternal instincts and carry their young on their abdomen until they are ready to be on their own. This can take two weeks or more.

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