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Content tagged with "arachnid"

image of a bold jumping spider

White-Spotted Jumping Spider (Bold Jumping Spider)

To identify this jumping spider, note the fuzzy, usually black body with white, orange or reddish spots on the abdomen.

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image of a bold jumping spider

White-Spotted Jumping Spider (Bold Jumping Spider)

Phidippus audax
The white-spotted jumping spider, like most other jumping spiders, is fuzzy, makes jerky movements, jumps surprisingly long distances, and doesn't build webs. This species usually has a black body with white, orange, or reddish spots on the abdomen.

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Image of a wolf spider

Wolf Spider

Image of a wolf spider.

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Image of a wolf spider

Wolf Spider

Image of a wolf spider.

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Photo of wolf spider with young

Wolf Spider With Young

Female wolf spiders have strong maternal instincts and carry their young on their abdomen until they are ready to be on their own. This can take two weeks or more.

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Photo of wolf spider with young

Wolf Spiders

Numerous species and genera in our state.
A wolf spider doesn't spin webs to catch its prey — it runs it down like a wolf! Spiders in this family have long legs and are usually gray, brown, black, or tan with dark brown or black body markings (especially stripes).

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Photo of a Xysticus crab spider, tan individual

Xysticus Crab Spider (Tan Individual)

Generally larger than flower crab spiders, Xysticus crab spiders are usually dull gray and brown and have brown, rusty, tan, white or yellow markings, and they often have a midstripe on top of the carapace (head). The first pair of legs are large and powerful, as in flower crab spiders, and are covered with many tiny spines.

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Photo of a Xysticus crab spider, individual, on rough blazing star flowerhead.

Xysticus Crab Spider on Rough Blazing Star

Crab spiders capture prey by sitting quietly on vegetation and waiting for an insect or other spider to pass by. Then, they simply grab and bite it. Moths and butterflies make up the bulk of their prey. Here, the spider is on a flowerhead of rough blazing star, Liatris aspera. You can tell by the flowerhead’s bracts, which are rounded, somewhat pouched or swollen, and have thin, whitish or transparent margins that are unevenly torn-looking.

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Photo of a Xysticus crab spider, tan individual

Xysticus Crab Spiders

Xysticus spp.
Missouri has several species of crab spiders in the genus Xysticus. They are usually dull gray or brown with brown, white, or yellow markings. They typically live under bark or on the ground in leaf litter.

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