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Content tagged with "arachnid"

Photo of a female smooth flower crab spider on goldenrod flower clusters.

Smooth Flower Crab Spider

Smooth flower crab spiders lurk among yellow or white flowers, waiting to snag insects, in prairies, flower fields, and mixed grasslands. This female, resting among goldenrod blossoms, shows why this species is sometimes called the "goldenrod spider."

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Photo of a smooth flower crab spider, whitish individual, on native aster flower

Smooth Flower Crab Spider On Aster Flower

The female has a white or yellow carapace, darkening somewhat toward the edges, without spines. The eye region can be marked red, as the yellow-white abdomen often is, with two separate stripes extending midway around the perimeter of the abdomen.

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Photo of a smooth flower crab spider, yellow individual, on ox-eye daisy flower

Smooth Flower Crab Spider On Ox-Eye Daisy

Smooth flower crab spiders have some capacity to change color from white to yellow, depending upon the blossoms they are inhabiting. They don't use webs to capture their prey; instead, they hide in flowers and wait for insects to fly or crawl to them. Crab spiders often look like part of the flowers they inhabit.

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Spider! Spider!

This content is archived
A report on the enemy's movements and lifestyle.

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Photo of a Xysticus crab spider, individual, on rough blazing star flowerhead.

Spiders

Get to know and appreciate Missouri's most common spiders.

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Photo of a spiny-bellied orb weaver on a twig

Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver

There can be great variation in the color pattern, but the ten-spined, chunky abdomen sets the female spiny-bellied orb weaver (Micrathena gracilis) apart from all other spiders.

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Image of female spiny-bellied orb weaver on a leaf

Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver

Micrathena gracilis
The color pattern can vary, but the ten-spined, chunky abdomen sets the female spiny-bellied orb weaver apart from all other spiders.

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Image of female spiny-bellied orb weaver on a leaf

Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver (Micrathena gracilis)

M. gracilis, the spiny-bellied orb weaver, or spined micrathena, has 5 pairs of black tubercles and a white and black (or yellowish and brown-black) mottled abdomen. Orb weavers, including this one, spin wheel-shaped webs that are usually positioned vertically. This species tends to hang with its "back" toward the ground and the spinnerets pointing upward, with the abdomen looking like a tiny pyramid.

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Image of a fishing spider

Spotted Fishing Spider

Dolomedes triton
These long-legged, dark-colored water spiders are distinctive in that the oval abdomen is smaller than the broad cephalothorax. The rim stripe surrounding the dark carapace, and sometimes the abdomen, is whitish-yellow. On top of the dark brown abdomen, three distinctive pairs of minute white spots create a connect-the-dot pattern or run mid-line down the back. The brown legs are robust and dotted with white hairs.

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Image of a striped scorpion

Striped Scorpion

Photo of a striped scorpion.

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