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Content tagged with "arachnid"

Photo of a marbled orb weaver spider

Marbled Orb Weaver

The marbled orb weaver (Araneus marmoreus) is a colorful spider whose wide range includes all of the eastern United States. It’s sometimes called “pumpkin spider” because the rounded abdomen of this species is sometimes bright orange. The pattern is variable, and the color can be white, yellow, or orange, with mottling and spotting of black, brown, or purple. Females build their wheel-shaped webs among trees and tall weeds in moist woods, often near streams.

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Marbled Orb Weaver

Video of a marbled orb weaver spider in the wild.

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Photo of arrow-shaped micrathena spider

Micrathena Spiders

Spiders in the genus Micrathena
Some of us hate blundering into spider webs, but it's consoling to learn more about the creatures whose homes we’re destroying. Micrathenas are one group of spiders whose webs are commonly “nailed” by hikers!

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Miscellany

This content is archived
"Miscellany" for the May 2007 Missouri Conservationist.

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Missouri Tarantula

Video of a Missouri tarantula in the wild.

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Image of a tarantula

Missouri Tarantula

Aphonopelma hentzi
The Missouri tarantula is our state's largest spider. The hairy body and legs are uniformly dark chocolate brown, with reddish hairs on the carapace. Look for it on dry, rocky glades.

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orchard orb weaver

Orchard Orb Weaver

Leucauge venusta
Orchard orb weavers are colorful greenish, delicate spiders that make circular webs in low bushes and damp woodlands. They typically hang in the middle of their webs.

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Image of a pseudoscorpion.

Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion (dead specimen).

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Image of a pseudoscorpion.

Pseudoscorpions

Various species in the order Pseudoscorpionida
Pseudoscorpions are unusual little arachnids. They look something like tiny scorpions but with a rounded (and nonvenomous) hind end. They are often overlooked. Learn more about these fascinating animals.

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Reflections

This content is archived
"Reflections" for the August 1997 Missouri Conservationist.

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