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Content tagged with "aquatic insect"

Photo of a water boatman

Water Boatman (Viewed From Above)

Water boatmen typically have crosslines on their backs, and they swim with their back facing upward (not "belly-up").

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Photo of a water boatman

Water Boatman Underwater

A thin, silvery bubble of air, trapped against the body, enables the insect to stay for periods underwater.

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Photo of a water boatman

Water Boatmen

About 125 species in North America in the family Corixidae
Water boatmen are one of the few aquatic “true bugs” that are not predaceous and do not bite people. Instead, they suck juices from algae and detritus. Only a few species eat other small aquatic creatures. Learn more about these nifty water bugs.

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Photo of a water penny beetle clinging to a wet rock.

Water Penny Beetle

The flat, brown, nearly circular aquatic larvae of water penny beetles are more often noticed than the adults, which are small, dark, fairly unremarkable beetles.

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Photo of water penny beetle showing underside.

Water Penny Beetle (Underside)

If you inspect the underside of a water penny, you will see six legs in the thorax region and tiny, feathery gills under the abdomen.

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Photo of a water penny beetle and a nickel coin for size.

Water Penny Beetle and Nickel

The larvae of water pennies grow to nearly ½ inch long. The adults are black or brown beetles that grow to about ¼ inch long.

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Photo of a water penny beetle clinging to a rock in an aquarium.

Water Penny Beetle Clinging to Rock

The flat shape and ability to cling to rocks helps keep water pennies from being swept away in the current. It also helps them avoid predation.

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Photo of a water penny beetle on a rock in an aquarium.

Water Penny Beetle on Rock

Because water pennies cannot tolerate pollution, high sedimentation, and high amounts of algae and fungi, their presence or absence in a stream is an indicator of the stream’s water quality.

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Photo of two water penny beetles clinging to a wet rock.

Water Penny Beetles

Beetles in the family Psephenidae
Water pennies are one of the truly nifty aquatic invertebrates that bring out the child in all of us. Some of them really do look like pennies!

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Photo of two water penny beetles clinging to a wet rock.

Water Penny Beetles

Water penny larvae cling to the undersides or sides of stones and other submerged objects in flowing, unpolluted water.

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