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Content tagged with "aquatic insect"

Photo of caddisfly larva without case

Caddisfly Larva Without Case

The larvae of some caddisfly species do not create protective cases. Many of those that do not are predaceous.

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Photo of caddisfly larvae with spiral cases

Caddisfly Larvae With Spiral Cases

The larvae of some caddisfly species create protective cases that are spiral like a snail shell. These larvae have incorporated sand grains into their cases.

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Photo of a Cobra Clubtail dragonfly

Cobra Clubtail

The cobra clubtail, Gomphus vastus, is in the family of dragonflies called clubtails, named for the enlarged abdomen tip. There are about 100 species in this dragonfly family in North America north of Mexico, and more than 900 in the world.

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Photo of a collared water scavenger beetle showing back.

Collared Water Scavenger Beetle

This view of a collared water scavenger beetle shows the fringe of hairs on the flattened hind pair of legs, a characteristic of the water scavenger beetle family.

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Photo of a collared water scavenger beetle showing underside.

Collared Water Scavenger Beetle

Many water scavenger beetles have a spine running along the underside of the body, extending past the thorax and partly over the abdomen. The appendages visible on the head are maxillary palps, not antennae. The actual antennae are small, clubbed, and often held down against the head, so they can be hard to see.

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Photo of a collared water scavenger beetle showing head.

Collared Water Scavenger Beetle

Water scavenger beetles are a mostly aquatic family. They are similar to predaceous diving beetles, but unlike them many have a distinctive spine running down the center of their bellies.

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Photo of a collared water scavenger beetle eating a giant water bug.

Collared Water Scavenger Beetle on a Giant Water Bug

This collared water scavenger beetle (Tropisternus collaris) is feeding on a dead giant water bug. The water scavenger beetle is about 3/8 inch long. Giant water bugs often reach 2 inches in length. Note the hairs on the water scavenger beetle’s legs.

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Photo of a Common Green Darner dragonfly pair

Common Green Darner Pair

The common green darner, Anax junius, is abundant and well-known for its bright green, blue, and purple colors. A large dragonfly up to 3 inches long, it is a migratory species that travels south in autumn.

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image of Crane Fly clinging to a twig

Crane Flies

There are over 500 species of crane flies in North America.
Many people are frightened of crane flies, which resemble huge mosquitoes. But crane flies don’t bite or suck blood. In fact, as adults, most of them don’t have mouths at all!

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Photo of female crane fly clinging to rock surface

Crane Fly (Female)

Not all crane flies rest with their wings held at 45-degree angles to the body. Sometimes they're held straight down the back. This female crane fly was photographed in April, clinging to the base of the natural bridge at Clifty Creek Conservation Area, just above the creek.

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