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Content tagged with "aquatic"

Photo of a gilled aquatic snail

Gilled Aquatic Snails (Prosobranch Pond Snails)

Over 20 Missouri species in former subclass Prosobranchia
Gilled snails are one of two main groups of aquatic snails in Missouri (the other group is the "lunged" snails). Gilled snails, or prosobranchs, breathe with gills and possess a hard trapdoor-like operculum. They are most common in the Ozarks.

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Image of a gray-speckled crayfish

Gray-Speckled Crayfish

Orconectes palmeri
This crayfish is gray with numerous greenish-black speckles and blotches on the pincers, carapace and abdomen. A pair of large blotches are present near the back of the head, and another pair occur near the junction of the carapace and abdomen. In our state, it is found only in the southeastern section.

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Image of hubbs' crayfish

Hubbs' Crayfish

Cambarus hubbsi
This powerfully built crayfish is usually olive-tan or reddish brown, without prominent spots or blotches. A narrow blackish band is present at the junction of the carapace and abdomen. In our state, it is limited to the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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Photo of pulmonate snail crawling on rock

Lunged Aquatic Snail (Pulmonate Pond Snail)

Unliked gilled aquatic snails, lunged aquatic snails breathe via a lunglike pulmonary cavity. They also lack an operculum, the hard horny “trapdoor” that closes when the animal retracts into the shell.

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Photo of pulmonate snail crawling on rock out of water

Lunged Aquatic Snail (Pulmonate Pond Snail)

Many pulmonate snails crawl to the water surface to take in air, but others can stay underwater all the time. This snail was crawling on a dry rock on the edge of a creek. Except for in the Ozarks, pulmonate snails predominate in most of the aquatic regions in our state.

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Photo of pulmonate snail crawling on rock

Lunged Aquatic Snails (Pulmonate Pond Snails)

Over 30 Missouri species in former subclass Pulmonata
This is one of the two broad categories of aquatic snails in Missouri (the other is the gilled snails, or prosobranchs). Pulmonate snails breathe via a lunglike pulmonary cavity, and they lack a hard trapdoor-like operculum. Except for in the Ozarks, pulmonate snails predominate in most of the aquatic regions in our state.

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Photo of a mayfly

Mayflies

There are hundreds of species in North America.
The mayflies are a fascinating group of insects. The nymphs live from months to years under water, breathing through gills, and the adults fly around in the air, mating, living for only a day or two.

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Image of a neosho midget crayfish

Neosho Midget Crayfish

Orconectes macrus
This small crayfish is a subdued mottled brown, with a prominent black band crossing the carapace near its junction with the abdomen. The body is stout, and the pincers are broad and powerful. It is found in the Neosho stream drainage of southwestern Missouri and northwestern Arkansas.

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Photo of a predaceous diving beetle

Predaceous Diving Beetles (Water Tigers)

Species in the beetle family Dytiscidae
Like many aquatic insects, these large oval beetles prey voraciously on other aquatic organisms. Excellent swimmers, they fly well, too, and are often attracted to lights.

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Ramshorn Snails (Wheel Snails; Planorbids)

Gyraulus, Helisoma, Menetus, Micromenetus, Planorbula spp.
This group of freshwater snails is easy to identify at a glance, because the shell is a flat, disklike coil. Like other pulmonate snails, they lack an operculum (a hard horny “trapdoor” that other types of aquatic snails possess that closes when the animal retracts into the shell).

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