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Content tagged with "amphibian"

Photo of an eastern tiger salamander with irregular blotches.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

The yellow or olive blotches on an adult eastern tiger salamander vary greatly in size and shape.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander showing front half of body.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Eastern tiger salamanders live in a wide variety of habitats including woodlands, swamps, prairies, and old fields (near farm ponds) and may sometimes be found in wells, basements, and root cellars. They spend most of their time in burrows or under logs.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander on dry oak leaves.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Eastern tiger salamander populations are declining overall when compared to historical levels. They need fishless water holes, ponds, and swamps to survive, and you can help them by developing and maintaining these features on your property.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander’s head.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Days are spent in burrows or under logs, as tiger salamanders are active only at night. Your best chance of seeing a tiger salamander is at night after a heavy rain.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander larva.

Eastern Tiger Salamander Larva

Like the young of most other salamanders, the larvae of tiger salamanders are aquatic and have feathery-looking external (exposed) gills.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander larva.

Eastern Tiger Salamander Larva

The larvae of tiger salamanders are sometimes erroneously called waterdogs. This is confusing, because “waterdog” is a common name for mudpuppies, which are in a different family of salamanders.

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Endangered Reptile and Amphibian Management Sheets

Browse and download best practices for managing your Missouri property for several kinds of endangered reptiles and amphibians, including Blanding's turtle, eastern massasauga rattlesnake, hellbenders, Illinois chorus frog, Illinois mud turtle, western chicken turtle, and western fox snake.

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Photo of a four-toed salamander on a mossy rock.

Four-Toed Salamander

Hemidactylium scutatum
A glacial relict in Missouri’s eastern Ozarks, the four-toed salamander lives among mosses in heavily forested streams and creeks and sinkhole ponds. In the northern part of its range, this salamander lives in peat bogs.

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Photo of a four-toed salamander on a mossy rock.

Four-Toed Salamander

A glacial relict in Missouri’s eastern Ozarks, the four-toed salamander lives among mosses in heavily forested streams and creeks and sinkhole ponds. In the northern part of its range, this salamander lives in peat bogs.

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photo of Fowler's Toad

Fowler's Toad

Audio of a Fowler's Toad.

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