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Content tagged with "amphibian"

Photo of a central newt eft sticking out its tongue.

Central Newt (Eft)

During their terrestrial “eft” stage, central newts eat small insects and tiny snails they find under logs and rocks.

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Photo of a central newt eft on a white background.

Central Newt (Eft)

Central newts have a complex life cycle. Upon hatching from eggs laid on aquatic plants, they live their first few months as aquatic larvae with feathery external gills. In late July or early August, they transform into land-dwelling efts. After living 2–3 years on land, they return to a pond or swamp, change into aquatic adults, and spend the rest of their lives mostly in water.

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Photo of a dark-sided salamander on a rock.

Dark-Sided Salamander

Compared to the long-tailed salamander, the dark-sided salamander subspecies (Eurycea longicauda melanopleura) has large amounts of dark pigment along the sides, from the head onto the tail, and has larger and more numerous dark spots on the back. This subspecies occurs throughout most of southern and eastern Missouri.

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Image of an american toad

Eastern American Toad

Anaxyrus americanus americanus (formerly Bufo americanus)
The eastern American toad is medium-sized, with horizontal pupils and with a kidney-shaped gland behind each eye. Despite their rough complexion, most people find these common, harmless toads endearing.

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Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad

Audio of an Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad.

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Image of an eastern narrow-mouthed toad

Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad

Gastrophryne carolinensis
The eastern narrow-mouthed toad is an unusual, plump little amphibian that is seldom seen. There is a fold of skin behind its narrow, pointed head. It occurs in the southern half of the state.

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Eastern Spadefoot

Video of an eastern spadefoot in the wild.

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Image of an eastern spadefoot

Eastern Spadefoot

Scaphiopus holbrookii
The eastern spadefoot is a stout, toadlike amphibian with large, protruding eyes, vertically elliptical pupils, short legs, and large feet. In Missouri, it occurs in eastern counties along the Mississippi River and in the Bootheel.

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Eastern Tiger Salamander

Ambystoma tigrinum
Tiger salamanders belong to the “mole salamander” family, named because they spend most of their time underground, often in burrows made by small mammals or under logs and rocks. Your best chance of seeing tiger salamander is at night after a heavy rain.

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Endangered Reptile and Amphibian Management Sheets

Browse and download best practices for managing your Missouri property for several kinds of endangered reptiles and amphibians, including Blanding's turtle, eastern massasauga rattlesnake, hellbenders, Illinois chorus frog, Illinois mud turtle, western chicken turtle, and western fox snake.

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