Content tagged with "amphibian"

Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog
Boreal chorus frog on pond's edge. More

Boreal Chorus Frog (Western Chorus Frog)

Boreal Chorus Frog
Pseudacris maculata
More often heard than seen, the boreal chorus frog calls with a vibrating “prrreeep” that rises in pitch at the end—it lasts one or two seconds and sounds like someone running a fingernail over the teeth of a pocket comb. Our species was long considered the “western chorus frog” Pseudacris triseriata, but scientists now recognize it as a separate species. More

Bullfrogs and green frogs up for grabs June 30

This content is archived
Bullfrog
Missouri’s annual frogging season runs from June 30 to Oct. 31. More

Cape Girardeau Nature Center offers women’s frog-gigging clinic

This content is archived
Bullfrog
Some lucky southeast Missouri women will learn to gig frogs at a free event offered by the Missouri Department of Conservation's (MDC) Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center. More

Cave Salamander

Image of a cave salamander
Eurycea lucifuga
This common amphibian of the Ozark Plateau lives in caves, springs and rocky streams. Recognize it by its normally bright orange skin dotted with dark brown or black spots. More

Eastern American Toad

Image of an american toad
Anaxyrus americanus americanus (formerly Bufo americanus)
The eastern American toad is medium-sized, with horizontal pupils and with a kidney-shaped gland behind each eye. Despite their rough complexion, most people find these common, harmless toads endearing. More

Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad
Audio of an Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad. More

Eastern Narrow-Mouthed Toad

Image of an eastern narrow-mouthed toad
Gastrophryne carolinensis
The eastern narrow-mouthed toad is an unusual, plump little amphibian that is seldom seen. There is a fold of skin behind its narrow, pointed head. It occurs in the southern half of the state. More

Eastern Spadefoot

Video of an eastern spadefoot in the wild. More

Eastern Spadefoot

Image of an eastern spadefoot
Scaphiopus holbrookii
Often called “spadefoot toads,” spadefoots are actually not true toads, and they are not true frogs, either. They’re named after a feature on the inner surface of their hind feet, a sickle-shaped spur or “spade,” which helps them to dig their burrows. More