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Content tagged with "amphibian"

Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal chorus frog on pond's edge.

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Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog (Western Chorus Frog)

Pseudacris maculata
More often heard than seen, the boreal chorus frog calls with a vibrating “prrreeep” that rises in pitch at the end. It lasts one or two seconds and sounds like someone running a fingernail over the teeth of a pocket comb. For a long time, our species was called the western chorus frog, but scientists now recognize it as a separate species.

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Bullfrog

Bullfrogs and green frogs up for grabs June 30

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Missouri’s annual frogging season runs from June 30 to Oct. 31.

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Bullfrog

Cape Girardeau Nature Center offers women’s frog-gigging clinic

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Some lucky southeast Missouri women will learn to gig frogs at a free event offered by the Missouri Department of Conservation's (MDC) Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center.

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Image of a cave salamander

Cave Salamander

Eurycea lucifuga
This common amphibian of the Ozark Plateau lives in caves, springs and rocky streams. Recognize it by its normally bright orange skin dotted with dark brown or black spots.

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Photo of a central newt adult on a plastic aquarium plant.

Central Newt

Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis
A small, olive-brown salamander with a fascinating life cycle, the central newt lives in and around woodland ponds and swamps in all but our far northwestern counties.

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Photo of a central newt adult suspended in water.

Central Newt (Adult)

The adult central newt lacks gills and costal grooves (vertical grooves along the sides). The back is olive brown. Numerous small black spots usually cover the body. A dark line runs from the nostril through the eye to the forelimbs.

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Photo of a central newt adult on a plastic aquarium plant.

Central Newt (Adult)

A small, olive-brown salamander with a fascinating life cycle, the central newt lives in and around woodland ponds and swamps in all but our far northwestern counties.

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Photo of a central newt eft showing bumpy skin.

Central Newt (Eft)

Central newts live on land in the middle, or “eft” stage of their life cycle. Efts are dull brown to reddish brown, with a rounded (not flattened) tail and rough skin.

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Photo of a central newt eft on a leaf.

Central Newt (Eft)

During their terrestrial “eft” stage, central newts take shelter under logs, rocks, or piles of dead leaves in wooded areas and may travel far from the ponds they hatched in.

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