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Content tagged with "amanita"

Photo of an unknown amanita mushroom with a yellow cap

Amanita (Unknown Species)

Eating only a tiny amount of a poisonous amanita species can be deadly. Experienced mushroom hunters avoid amanitas for this reason. Identification can be difficult. Don't eat any parasol-shaped mushrooms with white gills. Several experienced mushroom hunters asked to identify the one in this picture cannot say for sure what it is.

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Photo of a blusher, a tan gilled mushroom, showing injured spot turning rust red

Amanitas

Amanita spp. (about 600 species, worldwide)
This large group of mushrooms accounts for 90 percent of mushroom-related deaths, so every mushroom hunter should be familiar with amanitas. They contain one of the deadliest poisons found in nature!

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Photo of a blusher, a tan gilled mushroom, showing injured spot turning rust red

Blusher

Amanita rubescens
The blusher has a tan to reddish brown cap with pinkish brown patches and a ring on the stalk; the entire mushroom bruises reddish. It grows on the ground in oak woods and under white pines.

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Photo of a blusher, a tan gilled mushroom, showing injured spot turning rust red

Blusher

The blusher (Amanita rubescens) has a tan to reddish brown cap with pinkish brown patches and a ring on the stalk; the entire mushroom bruises reddish. It grows on the ground in oak woods and under white pines.

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Photo of destroying angel, a white mushroom, showing all aboveground parts

Destroying Angel

This is a deadly poisonous mushroom. Symptoms of poisoning often don’t appear until 6–24 hours after eating, and include vomiting, diarrhea, and cramps. Later, kidney or liver dysfunction occurs and can lead to death. Animals, including pets and livestock, are not immune to the toxin.

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Photo of destroying angel showing large saclike cup around the base of stalk

Destroying Angel

The destroying angel (Amanita bisporigera) is all white, with a ring on the stalk and a large, saclike cup around the base of the stalk. This deadly poisonous mushroom is common, growing on the ground in mixed woods and in grass near trees.

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Photo of two destroying angels, all-white, capped, gilled mushroom

Destroying Angel

The stalk of a destroying angel is white, with a cottony to shaggy texture, and there is a ring below the cap.

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Photo of destroying angel showing large saclike cup around the base of stalk

Destroying Angel

Amanita bisporigera
The destroying angel is all white, with a ring on the stalk and a large, saclike cup around the base of the stalk. This deadly poisonous mushroom is very common, growing on the ground in mixed woods and in grass near trees.

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Photo of several destroying angels, white, gilled mushrooms, at different ages

Destroying Angel (Variety)

The destroying angel is very common. It grows on the ground in mixed woods and in grass near trees. It helps trees to grow. It is a beautiful mushroom, but it is deadly poisonous if you eat it. Look, but do not taste!

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Photo of bottom of cap of destroying angel mushroom showing veil remnant

Destroying Angel: Cap Showing Veil Remnants

As a destroying angel mushroom grows, a filmy tissue called a universal veil surrounding the whole mushroom stretches and tears, leaving a large, saclike cup around the base of the stalk. A partial veil, which covers the gills, breaks free, leaving a large, white, skirtlike ring on the upper part of the stalk.

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