CRP Workshops Scheduled

Published on: Mar. 6, 2012

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will conduct a four-week Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) general signup, beginning on March 12 and ending on April 6. CRP has a 25-year legacy of successfully protecting the nation's natural resources through voluntary participation while providing significant economic and environmental benefits to rural communities across the United States. 

Offers for CRP contracts are ranked according to the Environmental Benefits Index (EBI). USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) collects data for each of the EBI factors based on the relative environmental benefits for the land offered. Each eligible offer is ranked in comparison to all other offers and selections made from that ranking. FSA uses the following EBI factors to assess the environmental benefits for the land offered:

  • Wildlife habitat benefits resulting from covers on contract acreage;
  • Water quality benefits from reduced erosion, runoff and leaching;
  • On-farm benefits from reduced erosion;
  • Benefits that will likely endure beyond the contract period;
  • Air quality benefits from reduced wind erosion; and
  • Cost.

What CRP Does for You 

Over the past 25 years, farmers, ranchers, conservationists, hunters, fishermen and other outdoor enthusiasts have made CRP the largest and one of the most important in USDA’s conservation portfolio. CRP continues to make major contributions to national efforts to improve water and air quality and prevent soil erosion by protecting the most sensitive areas including those prone to flash flooding and runoff. At the same time, CRP has helped increase populations of pheasants, quail, ducks and rare species like the sage grouse, the lesser prairie chicken and others. Highlights of CRP include:

  •  CRP has restored more than 2 million acres of wetlands and 2 million acres of riparian buffers;
  • Each year, CRP keeps more than 600 million pounds of nitrogen and more than 100 million pounds of phosphorous from flowing into our nation’s streams, rivers, and lakes;
  • CRP provides $1.8 billion annually to landowners—dollars that make their way into local economies, supporting small businesses and creating jobs; and
  • CRP is the largest private lands carbon sequestration program in the country. By placing vulnerable cropland into conservation, CRP sequesters carbon in plants and soil, and reduces both fuel and fertilizer usage. In 2010, CRP resulted in carbon sequestration equal to taking almost 10 million cars off the road.

CRP Information Meetings

In response to recent announcement of General CRP signup 43, multiple CRP Landowner Workshops will be held throughout the month of March to inform producers and conservationists about Conservation Reserve Program General Signup 43. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and learn from biologists how to improve the chances of their lands being accepted into the CRP Program. Information will also be presented informing producers on how conserving marginal lands through CRP can prove mutually beneficial for wildlife and agriculture production. Check this post on the MOre Quail Blog frequently for updates and addtional workshops.

March 14 Mo. Dept. Conservation NE Regional Office Kirksville, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Regional Biologist-Quail Forever/Pheasants Forever at (573) 680-7115

March 15 MU Bradford Research Farm Columbia, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Jason Sykes- Area Biologist at (573) 769-3512X6

March 16 USDA Service Center, 18450 Ridgeview Ln. Dexter, Mo. Workshop begins at 1 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Brandon Wirsig, Private Land Conservationist at (573) 624-5939X136

March 16 Memphis Fire Station, 104 N. Washington Memphis, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Craig Williamson-Private Land Conservationist at (660) 216-1588X111

March 20 Carrollton Public Library, 1 N. Folger St. Carrollton, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Andrew White-Farm Bill Biologist/Quail Forever at 660-619-1719

NEW -March 20 Ketcham Community Center – Sugg Room, 1301 Main St. Trenton, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For questions please contact Scott Roy at the Grundy Co. USDA office in Trenton, (660) 359-5685 x114.

NEW - March 21 Hal England Center, 801 Hickland Princeton, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For questions please contact Scott Roy at the Grundy Co. USDA office in Trenton, 660-359-5685 x114.

March 22 Litton Center, Hwy 190 Chillicothe, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Andrew White-Farm Bill Biologist/Quail Forever at 660-619-1719

March 27 Litton Center, Hwy 190 Chillicothe, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Andrew White-Farm Bill Biologist/Quail Forever at 660-619-1719

NEW - March 29 Linn County Career and Technical Center Brookfield, Mo. Workshop begins at 6 p.m.- For Questions Please Contact Andrew White-Farm Bill Biologist/Quail Forever at 660-619-1719

Key Messages: 

We work with you and for you to sustain healthy forests, fish and wildlife.

Comments

On April 6th, 2012 at 9:57am Kevin Erb said:

For conservation professionals interested in writing CRP plans for landowners, NRCS is sponsoring a series of workshops around the US, including Quincy IL and Memphis TN. See http://conservation-training.uwex.edu/crpworkshops for info
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