Fresh AfieldMore posts

Hummingbird Numbers Increasing

Aug 12, 2011

hummingbird at nectar feederMissouri’s hummingbird feeders should become busier places in the next few weeks, as additional ruby-throated hummingbirds move into our area from more northern states. The ruby-throated hummingbird is our only common hummingbird species. Note that only the mature males have the ruby throat. Our hummingbird numbers are greatest from August to late September. The number of birds that migrated north in the spring now have been augmented by the young birds that were hatched and fledged this year. As the birds move south, they will linger at nectar feeders.

hovering hummingbirdsSometimes disputes arise as one hummingbird will aggressively try to defend a particular nectar feeder from all comers. That is a natural behavior that also occurs at nectar-producing flowering plants. Many birds are territorial when it comes to defending breeding and nesting sites, but hummingbirds can also be very territorial about food sources. The bird is acting in its own best interest to defend its food supply, but it can annoy humans who prefer less selfish behavior. Hanging several nectar feeders in various locations, where one feeder can’t be seen from another, can lessen the competition for a single feeder.

hummingbird at trumpet creeper flowerBy Oct. 10, most ruby-throated hummingbirds have migrated south of Missouri. It doesn’t hurt anything to leave feeders out later than that and occasionally other species of migrating hummingbirds will be seen in Missouri, visiting feeders that are still out. Leaving feeders out into November might produce a sighting of  an “accidental” species, like the rufous hummingbird, a western species that is occasionally  seen in Missouri as late as early winter. Other "accidental" species that have been seen here include green violet-ear, black-chinned, Anna's, calliope and broad-tailed hummingbirds. Identification of these fall species can be extremely difficult due to subdued or immature plumage.  

It is a myth that leaving feeders out too late will keep hummingbirds here when they should be migrating south.

Comments

Butch:You can send your photos to readerphoto@mdc.mo.gov.

I've some very good pictures I took this week of a humming bird at my feeder. Is there a gallery that I can send them to? Butch

Recent Posts

Blue-winged Teal In Flight

Testing the Waters

Sep 09, 2016

Have you ever been interested in duck hunting, but the idea of weathering the cold has kept you from taking that extra step out into the marsh?  Or perhaps you do duck hunt, but have that friend who tried it once, had leaky waders in the dead of winter, and swore he or she would never go back.  Well, it just so happens ... 

bumblebee

Busy Bees

Sep 05, 2016

Their sight and sound might bring panic at a picnic, but our need for bees is crucial.

Closeup of yellow garden spider on web

The Itsy-Bitsy Garden Spider

Aug 29, 2016

It’s a shame that little Miss Muffett was too frightened to meet the spider that sat down beside her. She would have discovered that spiders are exceptional creatures.