Fresh AfieldMore posts

Heart Beats for Wildlife

Feb 13, 2009

With Valentine’s Day near, it seems a natural time to get to the heart of the matter. First, I want to pass on a fun Web link for you to consider for a wildlife valentine E-card from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: http://www.fws.gov/letsgooutside

HummingbirdAnd in the spirit of the season, I offer an eclectic mix of facts that may pique your interest related to hearts and wildlife from a mix of web sources. Did you know that:

Hummingbirds' hearts beat at 1,260 beats per minute (bpm) in the day and 50 bpm at night.

Groundhogs normally have heartbeats at 160 per minute, but when they’re overwintering it slows to just 4 bpm.

The hognose snake plays dead by flipping over on its back. At the same time its heartrate can drop from 50-80 beats per minute to just 3-15 bpm.

(Opossums play dead, too, with the heart rated slowed…but I haven’t got a pulse check on the rate change.)

When a bat hibernates, its heart rate is 8 bpm, down from the usual 210 bpm.

Turkeys by comparison beat at 93 bpm.

Recent Posts

Discover Paddling, Discover Nature

Aug 17, 2016

Have you ever wished you could float silently through the woods, sneaking up on wildlife for a hunt, a birding expedition, or just a better photo? There is a way, and it affords you a lot more than just a closer look.

Viceroy caterpillar

A Cruddy Looking Success Story

Aug 15, 2016

With the Olympics wrapping up soon, sports enthusiasts and candid viewers alike have been plugged in and watching the next big event.  In nature's game of survival, there too are a variety of “headlines” that can amaze and inspire. 

Photo of an adult female house cricket walking on bark

Hearing Crickets

Aug 01, 2016

The cricket’s song can recall the carefree summer days of childhood. But usually we reduce the chirping to background noise.