Delay in flooding Pool 8

Published on: Nov. 18, 2011

If you’ve being keeping up with the Duck Creek blog, we’ve mentioned flooding Pool 8 in November a couple of times. The decision to flood has been delayed, and we wanted to pass this along to keep you informed.

The staff at Mingo NWR have been monitoring the young red oak regeneration over the past few weeks across the refuge and in Pool 8. The larger trees have mostly gone dormant now; however, the 1- and 2-year-old cohorts remain actively growing. If you haven't read our earlier post "Flash In The Pin," take a moment to read it.

Mingo NWR has decided to delay impounding water in Pool 8 until these small trees begin to show signs of dormancy. Flooding these trees would not kill them outright but would prematurely shut down the transfer of nutrients to their roots and subject them to a highly stressed state next spring. Mingo will shortly be providing a more thorough update on its Facebook page, and we will post it on the blog when it is online.

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Comments

On December 14th, 2011 at 8:27pm bandtaker1 said:

Merry Christmas !!! Has any progress been made in repairing the rice levee in Field 1? Any chance Unit A will be available to hunt before the end of the duck season?

On December 6th, 2011 at 11:07am Paul Sanchez said:

Some really interesting points you have written. Aided me a lot, just what I was looking for : D.

On November 20th, 2011 at 5:46pm frank said:

Mingo posted this on their Facebook page to explain the delay:  " Many people have been asking when we will be flooding Pool 8 (wade and shoot). Due to excellent habitat conditions during the fall of 2010 and summer of 2011 we had a huge recruitment class of pin oak seedlings. Years when we have a seedling crop like this one are rare and must be taken full advantage of because these trees will be the ones that replace the mature trees that provide our current habitat. These seedlings are the last to go dormant and can be killed if they are flooded too early. We will watch them closely and as soon as their leaves start to change we will drop the gates and flood the unit. If you have any questions please feel free to call us at 573-222-3589."

On November 19th, 2011 at 6:41pm Anonymous said:

I would like to know who to contact about the possibilities of a refill system, they currently do it in Illinois . When a party decides to leave at 8:30 in morning because they're cold or the ducks quit flying , then someone who decides to hang out to wait for a spot can go to their field and hunt it until the end of shooting hours. That's how ya can provide more hunting opportunity for the guys that are willing to stick it out for the long haul !!!!

On November 19th, 2011 at 7:09am Anonymousbill said:

hey what do you come to expect when its about holding ducks and not killing ducks,i would not put a drop of water in it for next 10 years,and next year i would make it part of Quick Draw

On November 18th, 2011 at 6:24pm anonymous said:

Season will be half way over before they start flooding Pool 8, then by the time the ducks find it , you'll have about 2 weeks to hunt it, unless it's locked up with ice, then your season is toast. I've seen it happen more than once, so why waste the time and effort to flood. If there is going to be delayed flooding from year to year, and it's going to be off limits for over half the season then we are gonna need other alternatives to hunt . is this not true ??

On November 18th, 2011 at 5:42pm Anonymous said:

This water thing at Mingo is being conserved way to much. The oaks that have been out there for hundreds of years made it through all of the years of flooding in the past, well before we ever dug ditches the put up levees. You are going to lose trees. There is no way around it let mother nature take care of the tree put water in there. My family use to own what is now Otter Slough. Ive heard stories about it being flooded down there more months than it was dry. So once again let the water in there mother nature will take care of what you are trying to conserve.
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